AlbertaBritish ColumbiaManitobaNew Brunswick
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nova ScotiaOntario |
Prince Edward IslandQuebecSaskatchewan

Will there be a job for me?

Canada's construction industry continues to lead the economy, with construction employment at all-time record high levels. Just look at the facts:

  • Employment growth in construction has exceeded all other industries in recent years.
  • Employment in construction reached a record high of more than 1.2 million workers in 2011.
  • One out of every 17 Canadian workers earns a living in construction.

Additionally, many workers are nearing retirement - so the odds are good that the demand for skilled construction workers will remain high.

The Construction Sector Council has created a province-by-province, trade-by-trade labour market forecast for the next nine years.

To find the job prospects for particular trades, visit the Pick a career section of this website and select the trade that interests you.

Below is a summary of the latest forecast by province.


Alberta

Alberta's construction industry is currently in an expansion phase and employment is rising toward the record levels achieved in 2007.

Over the next decade, oil sands production is expected to expand between 50% and 100%. With this comes a need for supporting infrastructure (for example, pipelines, electricity generation and transmission systems, transportation infrastructure, and downstream bitumen and synthetic crude oil processing) and this translates into increased construction job opportunities. There will be a plateau in construction from 2014 to 2015 and then a wave of new building from 2016 to 2018 - well above the construction peak in 2008.

Trades that are expected to be in short supply in the province include the following:

In some cases, the jobs will require specialized skills within a trade, such as bricklayers with experience in refractory work and carpenter scaffolders.

In the residential sector, more than 4,600 jobs are expected to be created between 2013 and 2014.

Overall, Alberta will need about 30,000 construction workers to replace those who are expected to retire between 2013 and 2021, plus an additional 14,000 to fill the jobs created by increased construction activity over the same period.

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British Columbia

Over the next decade, the construction industry in British Columbia will continue to be a steady source of new jobs.

In the residential sector, job opportunities will revolve around increased new housing activity and an expanding renovation and maintenance work market. More than 12,000 jobs will be created between 2013 and 2021.

In the non-residential sector, there is a large list of ongoing and planned resource development projects in mining, pipelines, liquefied naturel gas plants and electrical power generation and transmission, and many will be starting up from 2013 to 2016. Many of these projects are in the province's North and will require a lot of skilled tradespeople. In fact, it is estimated that they won't have enough skilled labour for the projects, and this means increased opportunities for job seekers with the right skill sets.

Trades and occupations where they are expecting shortages include the following:

Many of these jobs will require specializations, for example, carpenter scaffolders and bricklayers with refractory work experience.

Overall, British Columbia will need an estimated 32,000 construction workers to replace those who are expected to retire between 2013 and 2021, plus an additional 22,500 workers to meet the needs of increased construction activity over the same period.

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Manitoba

Manitoba will see increased employment opportunities between 2013 and 2015 in both non-residential and residential construction.

In the non-residential sector, new and ongoing projects in commercial and institutional construction will be a continual source of employment between 2013 and 2021. Over the same period, employment opportunities on engineering and industrial projects will be up and down. Industrial and mining work is strong until 2015.

During 2013 and 2014, the following trades are expected to be in short supply:

In the residential sector, jobs are expected to revolve around renovation and maintenance work (for example, painting and decorating, installing floor coverings and roofing).

Over the next decade, Manitoba will need to replace an estimated 6,000 construction workers who are expected to retire.

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New Brunswick

Construction employment in New Brunswick is expected to remain near current levels between 2013 and 2021.

In the non-residential sector, a series of mining, utility (e.g., wind farms) and refinery maintenance projects boost employment opportunities in 2013 and 2014 and again in 2015 and 2016.

There will be increased job opportunities, especially in 2015 and 2016, for the following trades:

In the residential sector, jobs are expected to centre more on renovation and maintenance work (for example painting, decorating, installing floor coverings and roofing).

Over the next decade, New Brunswick will need to replace an estimated 6,100 construction workers who are expected to retire.

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Newfoundland and Labrador

Newfoundland and Labrador is riding a wave of resource investment that is creating strong employment opportunities in construction. Between 2013 and 2015, work on mines, electricity generating stations, transmission lines and offshore oil developments will create almost 2,000 new construction jobs.

During peak periods in 2013 and 2014, the following trades and occupations will be in high demand and in short supply:

In the residential sector, jobs are expected to revolve around renovation and maintenance work (for example painting, installing floor coverings and installing and repairing air conditioning systems).

Over the next decade, Newfoundland and Labrador will need to replace an estimated 4,100 retiring construction workers.

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Nova Scotia

In Nova Scotia, construction job opportunities will increase modestly between 2013 and 2021.

In the non-residential sector, jobs are concentrated in utility and industrial work (including the shipyard expansion) in 2013 and 2014. During this period, the following trades will be in demand:

In the residential sector, jobs are expected to revolve around renovation and maintenance work (for example painting, installing floor coverings and installing and repairing air conditioning systems).

Between 2013 and 2021, Nova Scotia will need almost 6,000 construction workers to replace those who will be retiring, plus an additional 1,000 workers to meet increased construction activity.

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Ontario

In Ontario, construction job opportunities will continue to grow between 2013 and 2021.

Greater Toronto Area

From 2013 to 2021, an estimated 24,000 new construction jobs will be created in the GTA.

The vast majority of these jobs will come from the non-residential sector (institutional, commercial, industrial and engineering projects.) Starting in 2015 and 2016, transportation and electricity generation and transmission projects will be a leading source of jobs as work ramps up for the refurbishment and construction of nuclear power facilities. From 2015 to 2019, construction employment opportunities are expected to rise by more than 40%.

The following trades are expected to be in short supply:

In the residential sector, employment is expected to pick up between 2017 and 2021, adding an estimated 8,000 construction jobs.

Central Ontario

From 2013 to 2021, construction jobs in Central Ontario are expected to remain near current levels.

In the non-residential sector, job opportunities are mainly available on commercial and institutional projects. In 2014 and 2015, small manufacturing expansions and renewable energy projects will provide some opportunities.

Eastern Ontario

From 2013 to 2021, construction job opportunities in Eastern Ontario are expected to remain near current levels.

In the non-residential sector, job opportunities are mainly available on commercial projects and the Ottawa light rail transit project.

Northern Ontario

Northern Ontario is in the midst of a resource development boom with a lot of job opportunities in mining and infrastructure projects, but the current list of known major projects ends by 2015 and 2016.

In 2013, an estimated 6,200 jobs will be created, with high demand for the following trades:

The residential sector is expected to add new job opportunities until 2015.

Southwest Ontario

Construction job opportunities in the Southwest centre on the non-residential sector. Several industrial and utility infrastructure projects currently underway wind down in 2014, and the Windsor bridge is scheduled to start in 2015. Projects peak in 2015 and 2016, creating high demand for the following trades:

In the residential sector, decreased employment opportunities are expected until 2015.

Overall, Ontario will need an estimated 75,000 construction workers to replace those who are expected to retire between 2013 and 2021, plus an additional 20,000 workers to fill new employment opportunities related to new construction over the same period.

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Prince Edward Island

Construction employment reached record high levels in 2011 and 2012 and prospects are good for sustaining this activity between 2013 and 2021.

In the non-residential sector, job opportunities will be available mostly in commercialbuilding construction.

In the residential sector, jobs are expected to revolve around renovation and maintenance work (for example painting, decorating and installing floor coverings).

Prince Edward Island will need to replace an estimated 1,000 construction workers who are expected to retire between 2013 and 2021.

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Quebec

Construction job opportunities in Quebec will reach a high point in 2014 and then level off.

In the non-residential sector, large mining and infrastructure projects are currently underway in the province's North. Many of these large projects will be winding down between 2013 and 2015. In the Quebec City and Greater Montreal regions, opportunities will be centred on institutional construction projects.

In the residential sector, jobs are expected to revolve around renovation and maintenance work (for example electrical work, painting, plumbing and roofing).

Quebec will need an estimated 42,000 construction workers to replace those who are retiring between 2013 and 2021.

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Saskatchewan

Economic growth in Saskatchewan has been leading Canada over the past decade with construction outperforming other industries.

In the non-residential sector, major mining, electrical utility, pipeline and other projects currently underway and proposed are expected to create more than 4,000 constructions jobs between 2013 and 2015. At the peak in 2015, construction employment will be more than 60% above historical levels.

The following trades and occupations are expected to be in high demand:

In the residential sector, employment opportunities will hold near current high levels over the next several years.

Saskatchewan will need to replace an estimated 7,200 workers who are expected to retire between 2013 and 2021.

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Updated April 2013